Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom

Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom

Bradley Prize recipient Stephan Thernstrom is the Winthrop Professor of History at Harvard University.  His fellow Prize recipient Abigail is vice-chair of theU.S. Commission on Civil Rights.  The Thernstroms are co-authors of No Excuses:  Closing the Racial Gap in Learning, for which they were awarded the 2007 Fordham Prize for Distinguished Scholarship.

The Thernstroms previously co-authored America in Black and White:  One Nation, Indivisible, praised as a “masterwork” by Hoover Institution research  fellow and 2006 Bradley Prize winner Shelby Steele.  They are also the editors of Beyond the Color Line:  New Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity.  Currently, they are writing a book tentatively titled Don’t Call It Segregation:  The Myth of American Apartheid.

Abigail is also an adjunct scholar of the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Researchand serves on the board of advisors of the United States Election Assistance Commission.  She was a member of the Massachusetts Board of Education for more than a decade until her term ended in November 2006.  Since publication in 1987 of her award-winningWhose Votes Count?:  Affirmative Action and Minority Voting Rights, Abigail has been a leader in the movement to restore and uphold equal protection of the law irrespective of group identity.  Her most-recent book is Voting Rights — and Wrongs:  The Elusive Quest for Racially Fair Elections.

A scholar of American social history, Stephan has contributed to the body of knowledge on liberty and opportunity in the American political and social order.  Stephan is the award-winning author of several books on American history and has written widely in opinion journals for general audiences.  In 2002, President Bush George W. Bush appointed him to the National Council on the Humanities.

Both independently and collaboratively, the Thernstroms have advanced the principles of equal citizenship, equality of opportunity, and civic responsibility.  Theirs have been much-needed voices of reason in American discourse.